Compare and contrast a good man is hard to find with where are you going where have you been

First, the grandmother listens to the Misfit; he has become emotional, and his voice is about to crack.

Compare and contrast a good man is hard to find with where are you going where have you been

With certain reservations, and the knowledge that, of course, every piece of art is informed by and mired in historical context, I'm more or less with Ben Jonson: To me, a discussion of for example Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go will generally be so much more interesting and worthwhile if it focuses on issues of human mortality, the role of art in life, and the effects of socialization and nostalgia, than if it becomes a discussion about the current moral debate around human cloning - especially one claiming that Ishiguro's main point is that we shouldn't clone humans.

Very silly, in my opinion. Similar to the rationale that "You should read Halldor Laxness because Iceland's economy is collapsing" or "Mrs. Dalloway is more relevant than ever as the debate over gay marriage rages on.

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You should read Laxness and Woolf because they are masters of their genre, because their prose makes your heart sing, because their characters will stick with you through all the years of your life.

Not because world events make them a hot accessory this summer. I know I can be a little shrill on this issue after all, people really should read for whatever reason they want, regardless of my opinionso I was intrigued when My Friend Amy pointed out Newsweek's 50 Books of Our Times list.

Here was a chance to meet the topicality demon on its own turf, and see if allowing myself to think in terms of topicality could add something to my own analysis of fiction.

What are the two main epiphanies in "A Good Man is Hard to Find?" | eNotes

I intentionally chose a book for which Newsweek's own explanation is vague: They don't go into it. It's on the list because of American Christianity, and the culture wars. And luckily, religion is one of the most fascinating - and consternating - aspects of these stories anyway. O'Connor was a devout Catholic who claimed to be writing to "reveal the mystery of God's grace in everyday life" In fact, when I was discussing this book with my mom herself a Catholic, although a liberal, west-coast oneand brought up the "reveal God's grace" quote, she stated bluntly that she doesn't think O'Connor saw any.

Which is a totally understandable opinion. Because these stories, while exquisitely crafted with a taut, brutal beauty, are extremely dark.

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To me, they at first seemed nihilistic. The characters are drawn vividly, with a few unflinching strokes of a scalpel-like brush; their guts and follies are exposed to the reader unapologetically, and by the end of any given story their hopes are efficiently and systematically crushed.

Compare and contrast a good man is hard to find with where are you going where have you been

They are lucky to make it out alive - or perhaps, as O'Connor implies in the titular story, the ones who don't make it out are the lucky ones: Sometimes this interpretation is fairly obvious; in the story "Good Country People," for example, the atheist daughter Hulga is humiliated for believing herself superior to an ostensibly simple Bible salesman, when he turns out to be even more of a nihilist than she.

In perhaps the most uncomfortable story to many modern readers, a poor white grandfather and his grandson, estranged through an act of treachery on the grandfather's part, find forgiveness for each other while gazing together at a lawn ornament caricature of a black boy.

This was, to me, the most compelling example of O'Connor's point that grace, suffering, and oppression are inextricably interwoven.Delivering Moral Messages in Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been and A Good Man is Hard to Find School shootings, bombings, rape, and murder are words that are commonly seen in newspaper headlines and heard on the morning news.

Dec 05,  · A Good Man is Hard to Find and Where are you Going, Where Have you Been both use gothic elements in a way that makes the reader feel scared because what happens in the stories could happen in real life.

A good man is hard to find setting analysis essay

In a good man, the family is taking a detour on the while on vacation and after a car accident run into an escaped convict, . ‘You have among you many a purchased slaves’ is a line Shakespeare uses when Shylock is talking. We will write a custom essay sample on How does Shakespeare compare and contrast the characters of Antonio and Shylock in the trial scene?

specifically for you. "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" and "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" While reading, "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" and "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" the readers find themselves lost in worlds of suspense, horror and comic relief through tone and symbolism.4/4(1).

"A Good Man Is Hard To Find" and "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" While reading, Where Have You Been" the readers find themselves lost in worlds of suspense, horror and comic relief through tone and symbolism. In comparing and contrasting Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find"() and Joyce Carol Oates's "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"() the reader can find many similarities and differences between The Misfit in "A Good Man is Hard to Find" and Arnold Friend in "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been".

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