Man versus nature in to build a fire a short story by jack london

To Build a Fire By: To Build a Fire Nature is always pushing man to his limits. When man heeds the warning signs that nature has to offer and those warnings of other men, he is most likely to conquer nature.

Man versus nature in to build a fire a short story by jack london

Day had broken cold and grey, exceedingly cold and grey, when the man turned aside from the main Yukon trail and climbed the high earth- bank, where a dim and little-travelled trail led eastward through the fat spruce timberland.

It was a steep bank, and he paused for breath at the top, excusing the act to himself by looking at his watch.

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It was nine o'clock. There was no sun nor hint of sun, though there was not a cloud in the sky. It was a clear day, and yet there seemed an intangible pall over the face of things, a subtle gloom that made the day dark, and that was due to the absence of sun.

This fact did not worry the man. He was used to the lack of sun. It had been days since he had seen the sun, and he knew that a few more days must pass before that cheerful orb, due south, would just peep above the sky- line and dip immediately from view.

Man versus nature in to build a fire a short story by jack london

The man flung a look back along the way he had come. The Yukon lay a mile wide and hidden under three feet of ice. On top of this ice were as many feet of snow. It was all pure white, rolling in gentle undulations where the ice-jams of the freeze-up had formed.

North and south, as far as his eye could see, it was unbroken white, save for a dark hair-line that curved and twisted from around the spruce- covered island to the south, and that curved and twisted away into the north, where it disappeared behind another spruce-covered island.

This dark hair-line was the trail--the main trail--that led south five hundred miles to the Chilcoot Pass, Dyea, and salt water; and that led north seventy miles to Dawson, and still on to the north a thousand miles to Nulato, and finally to St.

In "To Build a Fire," Jack London shows us that nature's true value lies in the fact that it does not care about humanity.. Whether he has imagination or not, the man's thoughts mean nothing in the face of the vast and cold Yukon. "To Build a Fire" is a short story by American author Jack London. There are two versions of this story, one published in and the other in There are two versions of this story, one published in and the other in "To Build a Fire" is the quintessential naturalist short story. Naturalism was a movement in literature developed largely by Emile Zola, Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, Stephen Crane, and Jack London in the late 19th-century.

Michael on Bering Sea, a thousand miles and half a thousand more. But all this--the mysterious, far-reaching hairline trail, the absence of sun from the sky, the tremendous cold, and the strangeness and weirdness of it all--made no impression on the man.

It was not because he was long used to it. He was a new-comer in the land, a chechaquo, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination.

To Build a Fire Quotes by Jack London Student Answers jjrichardson Student I think that "To Build a Fire" story relates to many issues hidden behind a superficial plot. The story takes place in a very severe winter; the man under appreciates the dangers of nature forces and struggles to return to camp.

He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in the things, and not in the significances. Fifty degrees below zero meant eighty odd degrees of frost.

Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. It did not lead him to meditate upon his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man's frailty in general, able only to live within certain narrow limits of heat and cold; and from there on it did not lead him to the conjectural field of immortality and man's place in the universe.

Fifty degrees below zero stood for a bite of frost that hurt and that must be guarded against by the use of mittens, ear-flaps, warm moccasins, and thick socks.

Fifty degrees below zero was to him just precisely fifty degrees below zero. That there should be anything more to it than that was a thought that never entered his head.

As he turned to go on, he spat speculatively. There was a sharp, explosive crackle that startled him. And again, in the air, before it could fall to the snow, the spittle crackled.

Man versus nature in to build a fire a short story by jack london

He knew that at fifty below spittle crackled on the snow, but this spittle had crackled in the air. Undoubtedly it was colder than fifty below--how much colder he did not know. But the temperature did not matter. He was bound for the old claim on the left fork of Henderson Creek, where the boys were already.

They had come over across the divide from the Indian Creek country, while he had come the roundabout way to take a look at the possibilities of getting out logs in the spring from the islands in the Yukon.

He would be in to camp by six o'clock; a bit after dark, it was true, but the boys would be there, a fire would be going, and a hot supper would be ready.

As for lunch, he pressed his hand against the protruding bundle under his jacket. It was also under his shirt, wrapped up in a handkerchief and lying against the naked skin.Jack. London: To Build a Fire & other stories. The main conflict in To Build a Fire is man against the cold.

check the answer key. The internal conflict: Man vs. His Own Stupidity: Can you find some quotes from the story in which London actually states that his character is not very intelligent. Search pages carefully. To Build a Fire Day had broken cold and grey, exceedingly cold and grey, when the man turned aside from the main Yukon trail and climbed the high earth-bank, where a dim and little travelled trail led eastward through the fat spruce timberland.

"To Build a Fire" is a short story by American author Jack London. There are two versions of this story, one published in and the other in There are two versions of this story, one published in and the other in Quick Answer "To Build a Fire" by Jack London is a short story about man versus nature, and for its protagonist, fire represents survival.

Because of the extreme cold, the man struggles to light a fire, and the condition of his frozen hands symbolizes the difference between life and death. "To Build a Fire" is the quintessential naturalist short story. Naturalism was a movement in literature developed largely by Emile Zola, Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, Stephen Crane, and Jack London in the late 19th-century.

The man "was a newcomer in the land, a chechaquo, and this was his first winter."Jack London's startling, and even cold, observation of a man's foolish confidence in the face of nature's power forms the story "To Build a Fire.".

What is Naturalism, and how does Jack London's "To Build a Fire" represent it? | eNotes